CONFLICT PREVENTION PROJECT:

Luxor Linkage — The Nature Conservancy of Canada

Helping connect habitat in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, with big benefits south of the border too.

Fog hangs over a still river beneath the snowy peaks of British Columbia
Jamie Scarrow photo of subadult grizzly bears playing in creek

Photo by Jamie Scarrow

British Columbia's Luxor Linkage
Fog hangs over a still river beneath the snowy peaks of British Columbia Jamie Scarrow photo of subadult grizzly bears playing in creek British Columbia's Luxor Linkage

Luxor Linkage — The Nature Conservancy of Canada PROJECT BRIEF

Grizzly bears don’t recognize international borders, so Vital Ground doesn’t limit our work to the U.S. We were delighted to provide a partner grant for The Nature Conservancy of Canada’s Luxor Linkage acquisition, a project to protect 960 acres of remarkable connective habitat between the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia and the Canadian Rockies to their east.

Grizzlies, endangered badgers, mountain goats and moose are just a few of the species that will benefit from the conservation of this lush wetland area. Meanwhile, establishing more secure habitat in the Purcells will increase the odds of Canadian bears venturing south into the Cabinet-Yaak and Selkirk ecosystems, where small grizzly subpopulations would benefit greatly from the genetic diversity that those border-crossing bears would bring. Helping bridge the Purcells and the Canadian Rockies—which extend north from Glacier National Park as part of the larger Crown of the Continent Ecoystem—could also help establish a northern corridor by which bears from the Glacier-Bob Marshall area reach the Purcell and Cabinet ranges. When combined with connectivity initiatives like Vital Ground’s Wild River project, the Luxor Linkage marks a tangible step toward connecting grizzly habitat all the way from Canada to the Bitterroots and Greater Yellowstone.

Luxor Linkage At a Glance

  • Partnership with The Nature Conservancy of Canada
  • Land purchase conserves 960 acres of lush habitat
  • Acquisition helps bridge Purcell Mountains and Canadian Rockies
  • Crucial habitat for grizzlies, badgers, mountain goats and moose