Habitat Project:

Wild River

Along the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, we’re stopping subdivision in a key wildlife corridor.

Yaak Mountain, Wild River and the Kootenai River in northwest Montana.
Photo by Y2Y/Gem Visions Productions.
Yaak Mountain, Wild River and the Kootenai River in northwest Montana.
Photo by Mitch Doherty.
ma of wild river
 
ma of wild river
Photo by Kevin Rhoades.
Photo by Mitch Doherty.
Photo by Kevin Rhoades.
Photo by Mitch Doherty.

Wild River PROJECT BRIEF

Grizzly bears in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem are struggling. Tucked into the northwestern corner of Montana, the Cabinet-Yaak does not benefit from the conservation strongholds of a national park or large wilderness area. U.S. Highway 2 follows the Kootenai River through the middle of the ecosystem, a geographic waistline that splits the area in two, separating the Cabinet and Purcell mountain ranges. Recent studies estimate just 25 bears on either side of the divide.

Connecting the Cabinet-Yaak’s grizzlies, and its other threatened wildlife, marks the goal of our ambitious Wild River Project. Biologists from multiple jurisdictions have pinpointed this place as crucial for private-land conservation, and now we’re teaming with the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative to make it happen.

The grizzly subpopulations on either side of the Kootenai Valley have shown little genetic exchange, and thus a high risk of inbreeding. But they both play a key role in larger landscape connections. To the north, the Purcells extend across the national border into British Columbia, where larger wild lands host a growing grizzly population. To the south, the Cabinets reach down to the Clark Fork Valley and I-90, the only things separating them from the vast Selway-Bitterroot Ecosystem of Montana and Idaho.

Shore up the middle of the Cabinet-Yaak and the potential for connected bear habitat from Canada to central Idaho becomes significantly greater. With Wild River located in a natural bottleneck near the confluence of the Kootenai and Yaak rivers, the corridor just needs protection.

Vital Ground protected habitat on the north end of the linkage in 2014—our Yaak Mountain property, which borders U.S. Forest Service land extending northeast into the Purcells. Directly across Highway 2, we’ve teamed with Y2Y on successive purchases in 2017 and 2018 to protect 42.5 undeveloped acres, followed by an upcoming 10-acre purchase in 2019. Under our stewardship, these lots will be restored as vital connective wildlife habitat, for grizzlies, Canada lynx and many other wide-ranging species, not to mention the endangered white sturgeon and threatened bull trout that swim the Kootenai.

Across the river lie public lands that open into the Cabinet Mountains. Wild River is the missing piece—it’s that simple.

Wild River at a Glance

  • 42 acres; 12 lots
  • Part of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's high priority Troy-Highway 2 Linkage Zone
  • Combines with our Yaak Mountain Property to connect public-land habitat in the Purcell (north) and Cabinet (south) mountains
  • Includes Kootenai River frontage; channel restoration work will improve habitat for endangered white sturgeon
  • Contributing partners include Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative and Kootenai Tribe of Idaho